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we know from law enforcement officials, stuck around, hung around, lingered. easily found afterward. it doesn't seem like they have expertise to be sociopaths and terrorists and horrible individuals, but they didn't -- they didn't have the wherewithal necessarily to get away. >> that kind of terrorism can occur whether it's international or domestic, tim mcveigh, one or two cohorts and not much else. we do think of things as big conspiracies, it sometimes doesn't happen. >> counterterrorism efforts are always developing. evolution of strategy. assuming this went down as we now believe it did, with two brothers acting alone or in concert with someone else. what adjustments will the law enforcement, counterterrorism community need to make? >> one thing for the american public to suspect, we are a big society with lots of mobility and lots of people coming in and out. there is going to be some level of risk for that, we saw that op monday. but we still had the boston marathon. it begins with our expectations of what kind of safety we have. there is going to be -- we don't know the fact
procedure when the macials take control. before that, it was local law enforcement and the fbi. so the marshalls will be in charge of him, until he is well enough to leave here. once that happen, he will fly out via helicopter, like whitey bowlser did. they feel like that's the best way to take him to his federal holding cell. how that went down today with the arraignment in his room, the federal magistrate was there, a public defender was there. he mostly answered with nods. obviously, he didn't speak a lot. that could be because there are reports of an injury to his neck. the fbi said neck/head region and to his leg and hand. he in serious conditionful he answered questions by nodding. he did say one word, when they asked him if he could afford a defense team, he said no. that's basic lite only words he really did say. the judge asked if he understood what was happening. his miranda rights were read to him. they decided to read him his miranda rights. those were given to him today as well. the security here is very tight. in fact, what is interesting is, he potentially might get
away what he say. i talked to one law enforcement official that has a little built of concern. and the concern is this, that we are finding more and more about his older brother, who obviously went overseas. there's questions about how he trained and he was somebody who was a manipulative personality. withwe are learning how he tookr of his wife, and by some reports pushed her very strongly to convert etch obviously is somebody, as we are hearing reports about his nature you are, was someone who was somewhat aggressive. the worry about a couple law enforcement folks i have spoken to is the younger brother may not have as much information as the older brother would have had. that's something they will learn as we go forward. but now that he's been mirandized, that changes everything as. we. >> adam, thank you. after the fire fight and after running over his brother, he took off. a homeowner sent swarms of police race to go a backyard and suddenly bomber 2, dzhokhar tsarnaev, was surrounded. listen to the dramatic reports leading to his capture. >> a report from watertown of 67
. anderson. >> all right. don. appreciate that. bottom line there, he's communicating with law enforcement personnel via writing. we are getting new information about the wounded suspect. let's go to deborah. >> hi. i'm being told by sources being briefed on the investigation that the 19-year-old suspect is on a ventilator and heavily sedated. every several hours in the care of doctors, an interview team goes into the room to ask the suspect questions. now these questions are pretty much focused, according to my source, on public safety. for example, are there any other bombs? are there any other bomb stashes? are is there any other weapons? he has been been on a ventilator and he is restrained in part because they don't want him to rip the tube out of his throat. we've been hearing law enforcement has been communicating in writing, but what we do know is he is nodding. the responses he is giving are being given by nodding. there appears to be some sort of wound to his leg. it appears due to blood loss. he did have a wound to the back of his neck. it is not clear how that wound was inflict
jersey governor chris christie wants to make some of the toughest state gun laws in the country even tougher. >>> good morning from fenway park! it's monday, april 22nd, 2013! now here's "the daily rundown" with chuck todd! boston strong! woo! >> what a great way to begin what hopefully is a better week for everybody thanks to the baby giraffes, an improv group from boston. those good morning videos, you could be tomorrow's winner. let's get to my first reads of the morning. let's run through everything we've learned since friday night's arrest. federal prosecutors may file terrorism charges today against dzhokhar tsarnaev, the 19-year-old man accused of the boston marathon bombings. tsarnaev is under guard in serious but stable condition at a boston hospital with a gunshot wound to the neck. some investigators believe that wound may be the result of a suicide attempt before his arrest. he's now being questioned, but only for brief periods because of his medical condition and is responding mostly in writing because of the injury. investigators have been trying to piece together the e
clear that there's any law that would allow him to be tried as an enemy combatant. this is a procedure we know works. people get tried in criminal courts every day. the combatant laws we don't know that one can be successfully conducted. that's lost in a mar ras in guantanamo bay. this case will take a long time, be expensive and complicated but he's going to trial and there's going to be a verdict. we know that. >> jeff, thank you very much. fran, julia, as well. appreciate it. follow me on twitte twitter @andersoncooper. what do you think? should he be charged in a criminal court opposed to an enemy combatant? >>> and we will dig in to the case. the older suspect spent last year in parts of dagestan and chechnya. and the older suspect's widow. what we know about her and their relationship and more importantly what the fbi wants to know from her tonight. >>> later, my interview was remarkable woman. i hope you stick around for this. she a dance instructor whose body was broken. she had to have part of her leg amputated below the knee but her spirit is certainly not broken. >> i woke u
the decision and, of course, i'm not second-guessing anybody. i did talk to a law enforcement officer over the weekend who, first of all, said, you know, it would have been much better for us all if this had been plotted out of a cave in afghanistan instead of, you know, an apartment in cambridge. >> one among us. >> yeah, one among us. but also he was saying not so sure about them shutting down the entire city and the message that that sends. you talk about copycats. the copycat said if i do something particularly heinous, i can hold an entire city hostage. >> one of the purposes of terrorists is to disrupt and forcing a city shut down and the rest, she used that end in addition to killing and injurying that you do. one of the reasons -- i don't want to second-guess the tactical decision to lock down boston. but i don't think this is something that if you will a scaleable or sustainable. >> no, we can't do this. >> imagine these guys hadn't been captured and all that. >> after what happened to the boston marathon in an internationally visible way. we were covering this all morning long. i
the process is under way. >> juliette, from a law enforcement standpoint, do you think it was the right decision to try him in civilian court? >> absolutely. like what jeff said, there is just really no debate about this. it's more of a political debate. for one, the law doesn't even cover him because he's a u.s. citizen. but from a law enforcement national security perspective, what better way to minimize the impact of terrorists than to treat them like criminals. that's what they are. if you make them into sort of a bigger deal than he is or anyone is, it sort of gives them a relevance we actually don't want to. so a lot of people in national security and counterterrorism love this idea. not only because of the legal underpinnings behind it but also because it sort of says to anyone who would harm us, you're just a criminal. >> there has also been a lot of successful prosecutions of terrorist suspects in criminal court. >> you can learn a lot of evidence from this. when i first got into this field it was right after the africa bombings, african embassy bombings in '98, and some of the
. >> if people are coming from countries where, perhaps, they grew up under sharia law, i think we can make a safe assumption they have been radicalized. >> lindsey graham was on some show this week saying this shows how we need better tracking. i'm thinking this shows how we need better immigrants. >> how do we give asylum to people from islamic countries, or islamic territories? i would submit people shouldn't be coming here as tourists from check kn chechnya after 9/11. dagestan, chechnya, kyrgyzstan, uh-huh. as george bush would say, none of them stands. >> let me get this right, krystal. asylum is not based on those that may be in desire of leaving countries that we think their policies are no good. asylum is based on who you are. have you ever heard anything more biased and -- and in many ways profiling people just based on their nationality? i mean, it's the exact anti-thesis to what asylum is. >> it's the exact antithesis of everything this country stands for. judging people. not allowing them into this country because of their religion is unbelievable. i would love to know how many
to die. as if these images weren't chilling enough, today in a newly filed criminal complaint, law enforcement officials described how 19-year-old dzhokhar tsarnaev calmly placed a bag allegedly containing a homemade bomb made out of a pressure cooker and packed with nails and bbs on the ground in a crowd full of innocent bystanders and simply waited. when the first bomb, allegedly placed by his brother, went off nearby, investigators say they could see everybody in the crowd react with alarm. everybody except tsarnaev, who waited a few seconds, walked away, and allegedly set off the sec bomb. days later he and his older brother tamerlan got in a shoot-out with police. today we learn more about the events leading up to that epic clash. according to the new criminal complaint, the night began with the brothers tsarnaev allegedly car jacking a man. the victim describes one of the brothers getting into his car and saying, did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that. the victim says the brother then removed a magazine from his gun, displayed a bullet, and said, i am serious. th
themselves from their now-deceased son-in-law, saying something to the effect he was a monster they never knew. how -- how are her parents dealing with this? >> they are taking it very hard. you know, the dad came out to get the trash last night, and pretty much said no comment. you can see it's taking a heavy toll on the family. you know, katherine glup the suburbs of providence. raised christian, went to college in boston, met tamerlan. she converted to islam, and by all accounts, fairly devout, wore the hajaab, the traditional head scarf. she didn't speak russian, so she wasn't always aware what was being said, she didn't understand the language being spoken around the house. wolf. >> chris lawrence reporting for us. just ahead, still many unanswered questions in the boston marathon terror attack. investigators work to interview the only suspect still alive. new insights into the investigation. stay with our special coverage. ♪ [ male announcer ] a car that can actually see like a human, using stereoscopic cameras. ♪ and even stop itself if it has to. ♪ the technology may be hard
the rule of law will support protecting the country in this new threat environment. but there just wasn't the case for treating this brother as an enemy combatant and i think it was very premature for some of my senate colleagues to call for limb to be treated that way. >> interesting point. also interesting we need to really reconsider. thank you very much, congressman. we appreciate your time. "outfront" next, authorities stop another terrorist attack. this one on a train between new york city and canada. we have a i love live update on and talk to a man who was there when police finally captured suspect number two on that boat in friday. how police talked him out of the boat. here's a word you should keep in mind. unbiased. some brokerage firms are. but way too many aren't. why? because selling their funds makes them more money. which makes you wonder -- isn't that a conflict? search "proprietary mutual funds." yikes! then go to e-trade. we've got over 8,000 mutual funds, and not one of them has our name on it. we're in the business of finding the right investments for you. e-trade.
filmed here earlier on the week, seen him on the news for the first time. and then for son-in-law reason, he tells me this is dzhokhar and tamerlan, and points at the screen and says here is tamerlan in the blue jacket and dzhokhar in the white jacket. and i say anzor, these are guys with the backpack when the photos are shown. it can't be them. he says i don't know, these are my children. and then his wife grabs the tv screen and starts screaming, i can't be, it can't be happening. i don't believe it. the children are dead. i would have cried out myself. >> reporter: nick walsh, cnn. >>> it was russia that asked the fbi to look into tamerlan tsarnaev's activities back in 2011. moscow said the older brother was increasingly turning to radical islam. bill black joins us now live from moscow where it is 9:36 in the morning. phil, the chronology of this may surprise people, because it seems that the return to radical islam, the request from moscow came before he traveled back to his ancestral homeland. is that the word you're hearing from russian officials, that they were worried even befor
, marking a dramatic turn for law enforcement officials trying to piece together what was behind that attack. our scott cohn is in boston and has the latest on the investigation. scott, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carl. it's hard to believe it's been one week since those horrible bombings at the end of the boston marathon. later today at 2:50 local time, the precise time of those bombings one week ago, there will be a moment of silence in boston and church bells will toll throughout the city. dzhokhar tsarnaev, the 19-year-old bombing suspect remains in serious condition where he is recovering from his wound, but apparently he is alert enough to begin responding to some of the investigators' questions. many of those responses in writing because he has gunshot wound possibly, self-inflicted to the throat, but amazingly, he and his brother for some three days managed to hide in plain sight. dzhokhar at umass dartmouth where he was a student, he worked out in the gym, even talked to friends about the bombing. imagine how chilling that was for his classmates. >> i'm in diss belief,
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14